Getting Ready for the End

This post describes, in part, the effects of a degenerative neurological condition called Huntington’s Disease. Any negative behavior on the part of my wife should be attributed to that condition. Any negative behavior on the part of myself should be attributed to my need for God’s ongoing grace.

Back before Christmas, you may recall that Janet decided that she was tired of fighting and wanted, to go be with God. However, our son and his family visited over Christmas and that visit has been like a tonic for her. As things sit right now, her attitude is much better and she is wanting to resume PT — all good stuff. But having said that, she is still basically living on yogurt. We have tried a few other things, but the result is always the same: choking.

So for now, things are better, but as with most things related to HD, “better” is always a relative term that can change at any moment. So I’m enjoying the present respite and refusing to worry about the disease’s next phase — I’ll worry about that when it gets here…


In the past, I have written about the process of letting go that a family goes through, and let’s be honest, the final stage in this process — physical death — is going to be traumatic enough without needing to worry about (for the lack of a better term) the logistics of dying. Please note that several of the things we’ll be covering could have legal implications depending on where you live. One of the things that has surprised me about this blog is how far it has reached. As I sit here writing, the blog has been accessed from more than 30 countries. For this reason, I have no way of knowing what local requirements might exist in your local jurisdiction. So please check with appropriate authorities for what legal requirements you might need to satisfy.

Much of what we are going to be talking about falls under the heading of End of Life Planning or Final Arrangements. Hence, the first important point to make is: Do not wait for the “End of Life” to formulate your End of Life plan! In an ideal world, spouses should have addressed at least some of these issues as soon as they were married, but when you are young and are convinced that you live forever, matters like these are often avoided because it can be uncomfortable to consider your own mortality. If you have been in the group just, “kicking the can down the road”, it stops now. There’s no road left.

The matter is especially urgent if your loved one has, or has just been diagnosed with, a degenerative condition like Huntington’s, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s. For much of this planning, you are going to need their input which means that you need to be discussing these matters while your loved one still has the mental capacity to communicate their thoughts and desires. For example, if your loved one is nonverbal and not eating, that is not the time to be trying to figure out whether they would want a feeding tube.

Maybe it was because we were older when we got married, or more likely this is just who Janet is, while we were still dating she and I talked about issues like what level of life support we desired in the case of a catastrophic illness or accident. Most young couples discussed wedding plans over candle-lit dinners, we discussed the pros and cons of feeding tubes and ventilators.

It is important to note that while you don’t have to agree on everything, you do need to know what your spouse wants for him/herself. Whether you are legally assigned as their medical power-of-attorney (MPOA) or just recognized as the “next-of-kin” you have, at the very least, an ethical responsibility to speak for them and not insert your own wishes into the process. When making these arrangements, you can discuss, advise and counsel, but at the end of the day, it is their life and (right or wrong) it is their decision to make.

The other thing you have to decide is what happens after they die. Ever since Janet discovered that she did not have Hepatitis as a baby (long story) she has wanted to be an organ donor and so has been signed up for years. However, a couple years ago we realized that the exact circumstances of her death could compromise her organs for use in transplants. Therefore, as a backup plan, she made arrangements to donate her whole body the McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas to help train future doctors. Alternatively, if your loved one wants a traditional burial or cremation service, now is the time to make those arrangements and, if possible, make pre-need payment arrangements.

Next, the surviving family — and the caregiver in particular — need to be thinking about how they want to spend their time the day that their loved one dies. Do they want to spend the day:

  1. Praying, crying together and consoling one another
  2. Running around the house like a crazy person looking for phone numbers and legal papers

Obviously, Option A is preferable, so now is the time to be making that day possible. First, you need to know what actions will need to be taken, and who needs to take them. I spent a chunk of time while I was in the Air Force flying with “The Peacemakers” the Strategic Air Command, or SAC. One of the things that SAC loved was checklist, because checklists are a great way to make sure everything that needs to happen, does. When the stuff starts hitting the fan in a serious way (whether it is World War 3 starting, or your wife dying), it can be easy to get emotionally overwhelmed. The checklist provides a point of focus and a list of things that you can do to manage the situation.

To create your checklist go back over your arrangements and decide what things need to be done, the order on which they need to be done and who is responsible for doing each of them.

For Janet, if she dies at home we know that the number for hospice as our first call. They will, in turn, contact the organ donation folks and the medical school to determine the final disposition of Janet’s body. Next, we have a list of family members that we need to contact as well as our pastor and a couple folks from church. By the way, that contact list includes an item to update this blog with a notice that I have it written. All I need to do is fill in the date and time, and post it. If it sounds strange that I would get online at a time like this, well, regardless of which of the 30+ countries you live in, you all are family too, so I want you to know. Finally, there are the legal calls to the life insurance company, social security, and the state agency that is providing disability services for Frannie. She has learning disabilities and her mother dying impacts (in a good way) the services that she can get.

The second thing you can prepare ahead of time is a binder containing all your legal documents to include: Will, hard copies of the MPOA paperwork, insurance papers, birth certificate, an up-to-date list of the medications they were taking, and so on. If you are working with a hospice organization, they can advise you on what you should have available. Note that this binder can also come in handy if the need ever arises for you to bug-out fast due to a fire or natural emergency.

Finally, and I can’t stress this point strongly enough, make sure everyone in the immediate family understands the arrangements that you have made ahead of time. You don’t need the added drama of someone getting angry because they didn’t understand the plan. Remember also that when “The Day” finally comes, people (including you) can express what they are feeling in a variety of ways. Some may get busy “doing stuff”, some may pray quietly, some may wander around aimlessly, some will want to sleep, and some may develop a sudden urge to play a video game or watch an absurd, pointless program on television. And some, remembering a past incident or hurt that the disease caused, may want to get angry and yell.

Try to organize sufficient family time combined with times that let everyone process as they need, as long as their behavior isn’t disruptive to the others. When there are disagreements, try to remember the real reason for the upset probably has nothing to do with what the argument is about. Rather, it’s because you all have just lost someone that was part of your life.

So, how about an 11th commandment: “Thou shalt cut each other some slack.”

In Christ, Amen ☩


A prayer for when you are preparing for The Day…

“Blessed are You, Lord God, King of the Universe. It is right that I should at all times and in all circumstances bless You for Your wisdom and care. But today I want to bless you especially for the promised eternal life that You have waiting for {The name of the person for whom preparations are being made.}. As I work to complete the preparations for their trip home to You, give me wisdom to make the right decisions, and when the day comes for their departure, please fill out home with your holy angels to soothe old wounds and to remind us of the reunion that lies ahead. Amen”

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